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20130416
20130416
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
at it as an environment problem, environmental right to save streets, as an environmental protection issue. not just simply who is to blame? who did something wrong? it's important to take a balanced approach to that, so one of the important causes is kind of intuitive but we don't focus on. it's the traffic itself. one fifth of the variation from neighborhood to neighborhood is the differences in traffic. the second important cause is vehicle speed. vehicle speed is really responsible for all of the serious fatal and serious injuries. it's a contributing cause. if the vehicle didn't hit you very fast you're not likely to die and we know we will have pedestrians and vehicles bump into each other. maybe we can't avoid that but we can avoid the death focus we slow the speed down. while we assess speeding and we know that 20% of the injury collisions are attributable to speeding we don't know what the impact of speed itself is because people are traveling 5/10 miles over the limit and not considered speeding yet that limit is having important and direct impact on serious injuries and fatalitie
in them and we, and we remove pellets and nails. >> stuff that could have come from the environment or concentrated enough to lead you to conclude that came from the bombs? >> i think they came from the bomb although i can not be exactly sure. >> how many amputations have you performed and how many more are planned. >> at this point if i have my numbers right we have performed four amputations and there are two more limbs that are at risk but i hope that we will save those legs. >> [inaudible]. critical condition or stable condition? and are they -- >> yes, they are in intensive care. they are in critical condition but at this point we stablized their vital signs and their hemo dynamic situation is under control. >> what are their injuries? can you describe what is -- [inaudible] >> most of the injuries were again lower extremity, major injuries and from these injuries they bled a lot. we controlled the bleeding rather rapidly, but, certainly they lost a lot of blood. that created physician logic problems. >> give an age range? >> do you have foreign nationals, any idea about the na
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
, open public venue 500,000 people you can't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)